Meet Beate Dalbec

Beate Dalbec has become a friend over the years and she is celebrating her first big commercial sale of an image of bison and Grand Prismatic to the state of Montana. Hear from Beate in her own words her path as a photographer and the role Art has played along the way:
“My introduction to photography came when I was 15 years old, a gift from my father.
I’ve always had a passion for nature and travel photography which led me to watching Art Wolfe’s “Travels to the Edge” on PBS. It gave me a needed boost and when Art offered a workshop in Acadia National Park in Maine in 2009 I jumped at the opportunity to learn from him. Taking this workshop completely changed the way I approach photography.
Art took me out of my comfort zone and made me look at the world around me with new eyes. I followed up this first workshop with a second one from Art the same year at Mt. Rainier National Park. Though the weather was miserable I was amazed at the photographic opportunities before us.Art has taught me to always keep looking, not just to go for the obvious shot. Sure, take it, but then keep looking for different angles, details, and never walk away too soon.  Anyone who has taken one of his seminars or workshops can attest that his passion for photography is infectious and that you walk away inspired to take your photography to a new level.
Through Art I connected with Gavriel Jecan and took my first photo tour with him to Myanmar in 2011 – I was instantly hooked on this gorgeous country and its wonderful people.  Seeing it through the eyes of a professional photographer makes all the difference.  My next project is an exhibit of my Myanmar images from this first as well as my most recent trip.
The bison at Grand Prismatic is my first big commercial licensing sale (and hopefully not my last).  I traveled to Yellowstone National Park in June 2011 with my mother.  While there I had hoped to hike up one of the hills surrounding Grand Prismatic hot spring in order to photograph some nice abstracts (I was inspired by Art’s captures which he had shared during the seminar).
With unpredictable weather I headed straight to Grand Prismatic to take advantage of some accommodating afternoon light.  As intended I hiked up one of the hills and when I reached a nice vantage point I was quite surprised to see a herd of bison heading straight for the hot spring. I just couldn’t believe it! I couldn’t really be that lucky that they would walk right past it?!  But they did! I photographed a variety of compositions, from the entire herd to smaller groups, vertical to horizontal to panoramic. After the herd had passed by, the dark clouds on the horizon earlier opened up into a thunderstorm. We packed up quickly and headed back to the car, drenched but elated to have witnessed and photographed this wonderful scene.
Photography is a wonderful creative medium that is available to anyone. My advice for other aspiring photographers is to photograph what you love and connect with others who share your same passion.  Try to connect with photographers that inspire you and take advantage of opportunities to learn from them. Lastly have a website so people can see your work – there are so many different options out there, that there is really no excuse not to have one.
And speaking of websites – mine is www.beatedalbecphotography.com
Beate Dalbec
mountain ridge

Guest Photographer: David Hall

Beneath Cold Seas cover: a lion’s mane jellyfish – the world’s largest – swims just beneath the surface

David Hall is a photographer and author specializing in marine life subjects and underwater photography. His photographs have won numerous awards and have appeared in most major magazines in North America and Europe. David’s latest book, Beneath Cold Seas: The Underwater Wilderness of the Pacific Northwest, was recently awarded the 2012 National Outdoor Book Award for best “Design and Artistic Merit”.

Beneath Cold Seas is the first large format photographic book to feature the marine life of the Pacific Northwest. Critics have noted that it is one of the few books of underwater photography to focus on a cold/temperate water ecosystem, successfully challenging the widespread misperception that cold water marine life is dull and uninteresting.
Beneath Cold Seas is published in the U.S. by the University of Washington Press and in Canada by Greystone Books and the David Suzuki Foundation; it has also been published in the U.K and in Germany (as Kaltwasserwelten). It is available at Amazon, and in many Barnes & Noble and independent bookstores; it retails for $45.
For more information, including critic’s reviews, a slide show and the link to a four-minute video, visit www.beneathcoldseas.com For more of David Hall’s photography, visit www.seaphotos.com

Here are a few images from this beautiful book.

Seaweeds above and below the surface at low tide

Migrating sockeye salmon in the Adam’s River at dusk

An Irish lord sculpin resting in a bed of plumose anemones

Goose-neck barnacles endemic to Nakwakto Rapids, British Columbia

Steller sea lions are among the largest pinnipeds; males may weigh a ton or more.

A northern kelp crab clings to seaweed near the surface

Orange sea pens – a type of soft coral – will retract into the sand if disturbed

The giant Pacific octopus is the worlds’ largest; it may have an arm spread of 20’ or more and weigh over 100lb

mountain ridge

Guest Photographer: Harry Ableman

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Walking into my first Art Wolfe Workshop, I was a self-taught photographer, anxious and concerned I may not keep pace. Within minutes I was diffused. Fast forward seven seminars/workshops and I find myself standing next to Art ready to board our small plane heading towards Coastal Brown Bears. If I knew then, what I know now, I would have taken the opportunity long before my first.

He has treated me as a friend; given knowledge and support peppered by encouraging opinion. He has shared; I have tried and failed and he has tirelessly shared again. He has crept into my brain, opened my eyes and opened my world. I have grown. For that I am thankful.

Harry Ableman

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