Night On Earth Wins Nautilus Gold & Gets Japanese Edition!

Two unrelated but exciting pieces of news for my latest book, Night On Earth.

For starters, Night becomes our fourth book to win the Nautilus Gold award in the Photography & Arts category, on the heels of Earth Is My Witness, Trees: Between Earth & Heaven, and Wild Elephants.

Second, the Japanese edition of Night On Earth will be published this week. Arigato to everyone whom has supported this book!

 

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It’s International Dark Sky Week!

This week (April 22 – 30) is International Dark Sky Week!

It may seem like a small thing that most may not ever think about, but artificial light pollution can be problematic for a number of reasons. Not only does it disrupt the natural habitat of wildlife by stifling reproduction, disrupting migration, and increase predation – it can also have harmful effects on human health and negatively impact climate change. Last but not least if you’re a photography enthusiast or simply someone who enjoys staring up at the heavens, light pollution greatly obscures our view of the universe around us.

There are a number of ways to get involved in curbing light pollution in your community. Most major cities may already have an organization or two to join or work along side. Community members can help measure light pollution and share data using their cell phone, and there are several things you can evaluate at your own home to cut down on the amount of artificial light contributed to the evening skies.

For more information and to find out what you can do to be an advocate for curbing light pollution in your community, visit darksky.org. Following the release of my latest book Night On Earth I had the pleasure of presenting with the International Dark-Sky Association’s Executive Director Ruskin Hartley. This is a fantastic and well-organized group doing great work. Check them out and get educated on light pollution and how you can help minimize it!

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Technique Tuesday: Shooting the Aurora Borealis

Recently my staff received the following question in regards to the above image:

“Was this photo a single shot, an HDR composite, or some other technique?”

Short Answer:

this is from the good ol’ days when you shot a slide (single exposure in this case) and waited a few months to see if anything turned out…

Medium answer:

All the details – Canon EOS-1N, Canon EF 17-35mm lens, f/2.8 at 30 seconds, Fujichrome Provia 400 film, Gitzo G1325 tripod.

Loooong Answer:

The aurora borealis, or the “northern lights” as they are often called is an atmospheric phenomenon that occurs as electrically charged particles from the sun make gases glow in the upper atmosphere. Despite the dryness of this scientific explanation, it is difficult to view the aurora borealis without experiencing a sense of wonderment and mysticism. It remains one of the most dazzling sights in the natural world.

To get this image, I flew to Fairbanks, Alaska, then drove eight hours north to the Brooks Range on the famous pipeline road to Prudhoe Bay. The Brooks Range lies within the Arctic Circle and thus provides a more predictable chance to see the aurora borealis. I timed my journey to coincide with a half moon because the snow-clad range would be properly illuminated by the half moon’s light. A full moon might actually have been too bright during the required 30-second exposure. I discovered that despite the fact that the aurora is in continuous motion, a 30-second exposure is usually fast enough to yield proper exposure and reasonably sharp lines within the displays. When I photographed this display, I was unhappy with its color, which appeared to be a dull, pale green. When I returned home and developed the film, I was delightfully surprised to discover that the film picked up the reds.

This photo is featured in the book “Edge of the Earth, Corner of the Sky” as well as being available as a fine are print.

Are there any photos in my collection you’d like to hear the story behind? Drop a comment below – your suggestion could spark an idea for a future blog post!

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#MondayMemories – Serendipity in Goa, India.

You never know what you will find when wandering around a city with a camera in hand. When light and subject and circumstance come together, magic can occur.

In this particular case, the facts behind the shot are nothing special. Workers had been putting gravel onto the parking lot of a restaurant in Panjim, Goa, which kicked a lot of dust into the air. Pedestrians were simply going about their business. However, when backlit by a late sun, the scene became street art–performance art. The activity of putting gravel down created an amazing atmosphere for a nicely layered image.

Standing back from the scene, I used a 70–200mm zoom, which enabled me to shoot a series of shots without interfering with the people so that they would not pay attention to my presence. I positioned myself looking directly into the late afternoon light so that the dust kicked into the air would be filled with light. I was not so much concerned about capturing details and faces of the people, as much as I was with the positions of the bodies within the frame. I kept shooting and reframing the shot as the scene changed every couple of seconds when the workers threw on the next load of gravel and different people came through the scene. I love the layering effect of the light and dust that comes from the backlight.

 

Photo tip: Dust, rain, humidity, fog, haze all add dimension to a scene when shot with backlight, light behind the conditions. It creates atmosphere and interesting changes in tonality and light, as well as creating layers in depth. Be careful that bright atmospheric conditions do not cause your camera to underexpose the scene.

Camera & settings used: Canon EOS-1Ds, EF 70–200mm F2.8 lens, f/7.1 for 1/160 sec., ISO 100

Excerpt from Photographs from the Edge.

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Night On Earth Wins Gold!


On the heels of being graciously invited to partake in the Night Photography Summit presented by B&H and National Parks at Night, I’m ecstatic to announce that Night On Earth has won gold in the PubWest Book Design Awards!

The PubWest Book Design Awards recognize superior design and outstanding production quality of books published throughout North America. A big thank you to our publishers at Insight Editions, who continue to support me and the projects I wish to bring to light.

An even bigger thank you to everyone who has purchased the book thus far. We’ve been shipping them out non-stop, not to mention the copies that have been sold at various events along the way. I love knowing that so many of you still appreciate the feel of a tangible photo book at a time when so much is online.night

You can still order your copy today – don’t forget to make a note to add a signature!

 

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Art Wolfe’s 2021 Year In Review!


2021 Year in Review

As in 2020, we did what we could to get through 2021. There was a rush to a new normal, but then a backslide. Thanks to the miracle workers at Moderna and Pfizer I was able to get back on the road, traveling for projects and teaching in-person workshops.

I began the year photographing in Kenya, taught workshops in Arizona, Utah, Washington, Oregon, California, Alaska, Iceland, and made two trips to Mexico. The highlight of my year was photographing the Mundari cattle-herders and their royal cattle in the South Sudan. This was a trip that I had been dreaming of doing for decades and it finally came to pass.

In September Tequila Time morphed into Art Wolfe Live, a very informal monthly show on YouTube and Facebook Live riffing on current events and photo discoveries and techniques. Parimal Deshpande and I continued with Earth Is Our Witness and there are now over forty episodes featuring discussions with some of the top photographers.

After a long wait for books, Night on Earth was published by Earth Aware Editions. It garnered glowing reviews from both editorial critics and book collectors. In December I was joined by Ruskin Hartley of the International Dark-Sky Association at Town Hall Seattle for a presentation. I also wrote the foreword for Private Gardens of the Pacific Northwest.

Watch Art & Ruskin’s Town Hall event here.

2021 keynotes included the Outsiders Landscape Photography Conference, the North American Nature Photography Association, and the Photographic Society of America. It was a distinct honor to be the recipient of the first Fine Art in Nature Photography Award.

I was pleased to be a part of the latest Remembering Wildlife book on African wild dogs as well the We Are Puget Sound: Discovering and Recovering the Salish Sea group exhibition here in Washington.

Despite an inauspicious start I hope that 2022 brings better things. I look forward to doing international workshops that have been rescheduled from 2020 (I am eternally grateful to those who have kept their reservations), working on new book projects, and doing ever more experimentation with photography. Even after decades of shooting, it feeds my soul and is a never-ending source of happiness. I hope to see you in the field or online!

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Join Art Wolfe at Seattle Town Hall December 7th!


I’ll be LIVE in Seattle next week for another talk at Town hall Seattle – this time discussing my new book Night On Earth – and I’m thrilled to be joined by Ruskin Hartley of the International Dark-Sky Association. Ruskin is an expert on the subject of light pollution and the efforts to preserve the deep, dark night skies that allow us to view the heavens and the trillions stars that surround us – among many other conservation efforts!


The International Dark-Sky Association and Town Hall Seattle Present Art Wolfe with Ruskin Hartley – A glimpse of night’s mysteries, in photographs – next Tuesday, December 7th At 7:30 PM.

Town Hall Seattle – The Forum
1119 8th Ave (Entrance off Seneca St.)
Seattle, Washington 98101

Nighttime is wonderfully mysterious, beautiful, and full of a certain kind of energy — and most of the time, we diurnal humans sleep right through it. Have you ever wondered what would happen if you could not only stay awake for it all but also peek in on what’s happening at night across the entire planet?

In his newest book, Night on Earth, acclaimed photographer Art Wolfe gives us a glimpse of nature, animals, and human activity on every continent, after the sun goes down. Blazing sunsets over Antarctic ice. Night markets pulsing with activity in Morocco. Glittering star trails over the Australian outback. Colonies of penguins awaking to the dawn. Wolfe reveals it all through a dazzling compilation of photos that Sir David Attenborough calls “…a suburb evocation of some of the most breathtaking spectacles in the world.”

Wolfe takes the Great Hall stage to present slides and share stories of his travels, the process of creating the book, and the fine art of picture-making at night.

Art Wolfe is an American photographer and conservationist, best known for color images of landscapes, wildlife, and indigenous cultures. His photographs document scenes from every continent and hundreds of locations, and have been noted by environmental advocacy groups for their stunning visual impact. Wolfe has created millions of images in his lifetime and travels nearly nine months out of the year photographing for new projects, leading photographic tours and seminars, and giving inspirational presentations.

Ruskin Hartley is the CEO and Executive Director at The International Dark-Sky Association, where he champions equitable access to dark skies and quality lighting for all through IDA’s award-winning programs. Prior to his position with IDA, Ruskin directed and managed conservation programs that protect land, water, and ocean resources. He has served as executive director of Save the Redwoods League, as president and CEO of Heal the Bay in Los Angeles, and as vice president of resource development at Fair Trade USA.

 

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Night On Earth – Published Today!

I’m excited to announce that today is the official publishing date for my latest book, Night On Earth! I set out to create a book that not only encompasses night photography of stars, cultures, animals and more – but also explores the margins of the night at both dusk and dawn. I wanted to capture the buzz of activity, the glow of the heavens, the lights of cities – all of the things that only reveal themselves when daylight gives way to darkness.

I’m incredibly happy with the way this book turned out as far as image quality, and the authors we worked with to make it a complete package. Included is a forward from Executive Director of the International Dark-Sky Association Ruskin Hartley, and an introduction by award-winning New Yorker staff writer David Owen.

Order your signed copy today! If you pre-ordered, your books will be on the way as soon as I can sign them. If you’re near the Seattle area I’ll be giving a Night On Earth presentation in just a few weeks on December 7th at Town Hall. Ruskin will also be joining me for this event as we talk about light pollution, how it affects each and every one of us – and what’s being done to minimize our human impact on the night sky.

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From Art’s Bookshelf: “Mother – A Tribute to Mother Earth”

I receive a fantastic gift in the mail today – a beautiful high-quality book encompassing the award-winning photographs of Dutch photographer Marsel van Oosten’s work over the past 15 years, and much more.

It stands to reason that a book chock full of award winning photos has plenty to look at, but the detail and design of this book is art in itself. It leaves a stunning first impression, with a textured cover and a gorgeous owl-pattered endsheets.

This is a large-format gorgeous book. Aside from Marsel’s award-winning photos, it also features his favorite images from the past decade and a half, with a wide variety of atmospheric and moody images of the natural world.

Not only that, but purchase of the book supports a great cause. From Marsel’s website:

“Part of the proceeds of MOTHER will be donated to The Canopy Project. Their aim is to improve our shared environment by planting trees across the globe. In 2020, The Canopy Project has a goal of planting 7.8 billion trees – one tree for every person on earth. For every book sold, 5 trees will be planted. For every Collectors’ Edition sold, 50 trees will be planted. 

The paper used for MOTHER contains no wood.”

This is a fantastic high-quality book full of amazing images, and supports a great cause. What is not to like?! Marsel, thank you so much for the gift – now with it’s own place on Art’s Bookshelf!

For more information and to purchase a copy, check out Marsel’s website.


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Art’s Japanese Garden Featured in Private Gardens of the Pacific Northwest!

Time for a #TuesdayTreat! I’ve been hard at work on my own book projects, but I’m also part of another book project – Private Gardens of the Pacific Northwest! 

Today is the official publishing date, and I’m thrilled to have been part of this project. My garden is one of 20 lush private green spaces shared this beautiful book.

Private Gardens of the Pacific Northwest is a stunning exploration of 20 lush private gardens. These sprawling estates, small sanctuaries, and artful retreats capture the natural beauty of the verdant Pacific Northwest, each one splashed with hints of boldness, modernity, artistry, and exquisiteness. Capturing the personality of those who cultivate them, these gardens have their stories told through the words of renowned author Brian Coleman, who takes readers through the flourishing natural beauty that the northwestern coast has to offer.

Over the course of Tequila Time, several questions came up regarding the possibility of a photo book based on my garden. I’m not sure if I have enough in the garden to fill up a whole book so now is your chance to check it out, along with other lush and vibrant conservatories. Order your copy today!

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