Serengeti Highway?

The government of Tanzania is launching an effort to build a highway across the northern reaches of Serengeti National Park—directly across the path of millions of migratory animals. This would be an ecological disaster for the wildlife as seriously undermine Tanzania’s important tourism trade.

For information and links to articles visit them online.

BLOG: Seregeti Highway? – Images by Art Wolfe

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Vanish Act – Can You See the Bighorn?

A bighorn ram rests amidst lichen-covered rocks, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA

And last week’s scorpionfish:

Papuan Scorpionfish by Art Wolfe

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Vanish Act – Can You See the Scorpionfish?

A Scorpionfish off the coast of Papua New Guinea.

Scorpioin Fish by Art WolfeAnd last week’s blue fox:

Blue fox by Art Wolfe

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Vanish Act – Can You See the Blue Fox?

A blue fox blends into the volcanic stone of Alaska’s St. Paul Island.

And last week’s sea dragon:

Leafy Seadragon by Art Wolfe

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Vanish Act – Can You See the Leafy Seadragon?

The Leafy Seadragon is found only in the coastal waters of southern Australia near Kangaroo Island.

And last week’s Marmot:

Yellow-bellied Marmot Rocky Mountain N.P. by Art Wolfe

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Vanish Act – Can You See the Yellow-bellied Marmot?

A Yellow-bellied Marmot watches for predators in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado

There was an interesting article in the NY Times on the effects of global warming on yellow-bellied marmot populations. They like the heat (the pikas don’t).

And last week’s manits:

Manits by Art Wolfe

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Vanish Act – Can You See the snowy plover?

snowy plover by Art Wolfe

And last week’s gray wolf:

gray wolf by Art Wolfe

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Vanish Act – Can You See the Ermine?

Heat wave?  What heat wave!?!

Ermine in Alaska

And last week’s gray wolf:

gray wolfe by Art Wolfe

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Vanish Act – Can You See the gray wolf?

A gray wolf, tired from tracking a caribou, naps in the rocky riverbed of Denali National Park’s Toklat River.

And last week’s doe:

black-tailed doe by Art Wolfe

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