Travel Tuesday: 10 Reasons to Visit Japan with Me in February!

I’ll be heading to Japan in February with Gavriel Jecan and no more than 8 other travelers for a special photographic journey. Very limited spaces have recently become available – here are 10 reasons to claim them!

1. Japan in winter is one of the most majestic locations you could ever imagine.

2. Take a tub with the charming Snow Monkeys

No, you don’t have to strip down and commune with the macaques. But this is an amazing photographic opportunity: these furry primates come down from the pine and oak forests and for a couple of hours a day they hang around a natural hot spring where you can photograph from within inches without interrupting their behavior.

3. Explore the wilderness that is Hokkaido.

Hokkaido reminds me a bit of Alaska, full of forests of birch, pine and fir with a back drop of beautiful volcanic mountains.

4. Dance with the endangered Red-crowned Cranes

Leave the dancing to the cranes. These elegant birds have been symbolized in Japanese culture for thousands of years due to their grace and beauty.

5. Fight over fish with the massive Steller’s Sea Eagles

Don’t worry, we’ll have plenty of our own sushi to eat! These majestic eagles don’t want to share anyway.

6. Whoop it up with the cacophonous Whooper Swans

Overwintering from Siberia, these swans congregate in the thermally heated waters of Hokkaido’s lakes, making for ethereal, misty photographs.

7. Take a break from nature and explore buzzing Tokyo

8. Experiential learning at its best. It’s my hope that the lessons you learn on this photographic journey will be referenced on your travel photography adventures in the future!

9. You will be traveling in a small group of 8 participants. Other tour operators are a minimum of 12 or more, so you will get far more one-on-one time.

10. Photograph under the tutelage of one of the world’s premier nature photographers and take full advantage of your time spent in Japan!

 

mountain ridge

New Photos from India!


On the heels of spending time at South Georgia Island & the Falklands, I headed off from Chile to eastern India. After a day to rest we departed Kolkata for Nagaland in the northeast and photograph the colorful Hornbill festival, where the region’s many tribes gather to celebrate their culture, art, athleticism, and much more. The cloudless skies and throng of festival-goers made for a frenetic and challenging environment to photograph in, but I did come away with many of the shots I was seeking.

From there we went north to Kaziranga National Park where we were treated to dozens of Rhinos and an abundance of other wildlife including elephants, water buffalo, great hornbill, and more – and then to Kanha in search of tigers. Unfortunately during the time we had allotted to seek them out, a cold heavy rain fell and kept them mostly out of view. We were, however, treated to the playful Indian wild dogs and other denizens of the area.

Enjoy the photos, but most importantly – Happy Holidays! Ill be spending mine with friends in Thailand, before finally heading home to Seattle for the first time in nearly a month and a half. . . and then it’s off to the next adventure!

mountain ridge

Flashback Friday – Travels to the Edge Season 1: South Georgia Island

Fresh off my recent trip to South Georgia and the Falkland Islands (see my recent blog post with new photos here) It seemed appropriate to reflect back on the filming of Travels to the Edge from that location. Enjoy this excerpt from the companion book, “Travels to the Edge: A Photo Odyssey” on this #FlashbackFriday and if you’re looking for gift ideas, my staff is ready to send off DVD’s of each and every episode!

South Georgia Island, the Southern Ocean

Despite it’s cold, unwelcoming climate, South Georgia Island in the South Atlantic is one of my favorite places on earth. A remote, hundred-mile whaleback of rock, South Georgia Island resides in the Southern Ocean, more than eight hundred miles southeast of the Falkland Islands. It features glacier-clad mountains rising two vertical miles above the sea. South Georgia is as wild as it gets, hosting one of the largest concentrations of wildlife anywhere. Over four hundred thousand pairs of king penguins walk the beaches and swim in the frigid blue ocean. Seals, albatross, and even reindeer (imported for meat by long-gone Norwegian whalers) also inhabit this isolated island. I used a wide-angle lens to photograph austere landscapes, intimate plant studies, and endearing animal behavior in this wildlife oasis.

On a tiny island near the coast of South Georgia Island, a courting male albatross bonds with it’s potential lifelong mate. The wandering albatross, with an eleven-foot wingspan, is clearly king of ocean birds, but overfishing and destructive longline nets threaten it’s survival in southern oceans. Some nets stretch up to sixty miles and snare fish and birds indiscriminately.

An adolescent king penguin challenges reindeer crossing through a penguin rockery on South Georgia Island. Long gone European brought reindeer to the island as a dietary alternative to whale meat. Reindeer herds continue to roam through the remote island.

Forty-pound king penguins line the shores of South Georgia Island. They are on their way to the rockery where territorial instincts prompt numerous quarrels among the birds. The beach is a respite from the dangers of the ocean and the crabby neighbors on the nests. Although the island experiences some of the worst weather in the world, we were fortunate to shoot in the pink light of a clear sky with the sun hidden behind the horizon.

Want to know more, and see these animals in motion? This episode is featured on Season 1, Episode 4 of Travels to the Edge, available individually, as part of the entire first season, and the full series! Have a great weekend!

mountain ridge

New Photos from South Georgia & Falkland Islands


Here I am in Dubai, editing photos in sunny climes that are in stark contrast to the cool temperatures of the South Georgia and Falkland islands from where I recently departed. This weeks-long photo expedition led by Tom Mangelsen, Frans Lanting and myself provided plenty of opportunities four our group to capture the variety of species that call these remote islands home. Our accommodations aboard the Polar Pioneer gave us all a chance to get to know one and other – making new friends is always the highlight of any trip.

Frans, Tom and myself were discussing where we might go next; leave a comment below if you have any suggestions! Enjoy the photos, and stay tuned for more as I head off to India!

mountain ridge

Due to Popular Demand – Two New Spring Workshops Added!


If you follow the blog and my Events page, you know being idle is not my strong suit. In looking at the upcoming schedule, it become apparent I had some time to work with – and to that end I’m offering two of my most popular workshops to late April and early May that many of you have been waiting for an opportunity to join. These are always sell-outs, so if you’re interested be sure to sign up ASAP to guarantee your spot!

As an added bonus, sign up before December 1st and receive an early bird discount of 200$ off each workshop!

Olympic Peninsula Workshop
April 25 – 28, 2019

From the dense evergreen forests to the expansive coastal landscapes bordering the Pacific Ocean, there is a lot to cover on the Olympic Peninsula. Wildlife, Waterfalls, the Ocean, the old growth forest – this location has everything, and we’ll do our best to cover as much ground as possible!

Abstract Astoria Workshop
May 1 – 5, 2019

This workshop has become a signature destination with so much to offer that repeat attendance is common. Not only is Astoria a historic location, holding the title of first permanent settlement on the Pacific coast, it’s also home to plenty of great places for us to dine and chat after our days shooting.

Click the links above for more information about these two JUST added workshops, but don’t hesitate to get signed up before they are full!

mountain ridge

Flashback Friday: Denali 1988

This excerpt is from “Photographs from the Edge”, which not only details the stories behind some of my most well-known captures from across the globe and throughout my career, but is also filled with tips and tricks and equipment information.


August 1988: “Rising Mist”, Alaska Range, Denali National Park, Alaska USA
Nikon F3, Nikkor 200-400mm f/5.6 lens, f/8 for 1/250 sec., Kodachrome 64

The nature of the photo: Mountains are well known for their fast rising and falling air along their slopes. Glider pilots in mountainous areas will fly right at a mountain side when the thermals are right, then catch a fast moving ride going up with the air. They often describe this as running and jumping onto an elevator that is already moving upward.


Years ago I was working on a book entitled Alakshak, The Great Country, a Sierra Club book about Alaska. I spent a lot of time crisscrossing Alaska gathering photos for it. As part of this journey, I wanted to get some aerial shots of mountains in the Alaska Range. So I found myself in a small plane above the mountains working in the hours between 11 pm through 1 am.

In the summer, this is a key time because the light is most dramatic then. During summer solstice in Alaska, most of the day is bright sunshine and you only have a few hours of twilight with bold light and color. I was using the shortest hours of the day to capture the most radical light.

In this image, the light of the sun on the Arctic horizon illuminating a few misty cloud sweeping up a slope at around 18,000 feet. While I like this image and I have long loved photographing mountains, it is not the photo itself that brings back memories of this moment. This was shot over 25 years ago, and I remember it all these years later because of the absolute turbulence that our plane would encounter as the plane would fly long the lip of the ridge.

I fly a lot, and I have been on planes around the world in some very remote locations. However, I’m not a happy camper when the plane drops 20 feet in an instant as it was doing here. I can often circle in ever tighter circles around the subject with my mind so focused on the shooting that being scared is not part of the equation. However, when a plane is dropping and rising with the thermals like this, it is uncomfortable at best and frightening usually.

I remember spot metering the brightest part of the frame which was simply the wispy cloud. I compensated for the brightness by exposing to make that cloud bright with detail. By contrast then the surrounding mountains and distant valley remain fairly dark by comparison. This shot shows off the ephemeral nature of clouds and light. Within seconds of shooting this, the sun dropped below the horizon, and the entire moment was gone in an instant.

Photo tip:
Spot metering can be a helpful technique when the light is dramatic and you have to be sure you get the brightness values right. In this shot, spot metering determined the exposure for the bright cloud, but that would have meant the clouds were dark and the rest of the scene even darker. That exposure has to be adjusted to make the clouds bright, not dark, by adding exposure to what the meter shows.

For this and many, many more stories behind some of the most notable photographs from a lifetime of world travel, pick up Photographs From the Edge today and make a note at checkout that you’d like me to sign it!

 

 

 

mountain ridge

2018 Q3 Image Gallery


From Katmai National Park in Alaska to Maasai Mara Reserve in Kenya; from the Canadian Arctic, with it’s icy waters, to the smoke and steam of Hawaii and it’s volcanic activity – I’ve quite literally crisscrossed the globe more than once in the third quarter of 2018. I truly feel much of this is some of my best work to date, and it’s going to make the selection process for upcoming book projects a difficult one! I hope you enjoy the photos – leave a comment below if you have any favorites! As always, just about any image you can find on the site can be purchased as a print – just let us know what you’re looking for!

mountain ridge

10 Reasons to Join Me in India this March!

Limited space is still available in my India Holi Festival & Tigers Photographic Journey happening this March! This is sure to be an amazing trip, encompassing a wide variety of subjects from the people and culture to the wildlife and landscapes. Here are 10 reasons why you should join us on this adventure:

  1. The People

Indians are a warm, kind, beautiful people! It is a large country with a lot of diversity in its population.

Kumbh Mela, Haridwar, India

2. The Markets

We will be visiting a variety of markets in Delhi, each with their own specialty and traditions. All make for great photo opportunities.

Fruit and vegetable seller at market, Rajasthan, India

3. Holi Festival

The Holi Festival, or “Festival of Colors” as some have come to call it, is a spring-time festival celebrated by Hindus annually – but has spread to other nations and cultures as well as a celebration of life, love, and the idea of good conquering evil. Not only does it mark the end of winter and the arrival of spring, but it signifies a time to reconnect with loved ones and appreciate the simple things in life. The kaleidoscope of colors and bustle of activity makes for excellent opportunities to capture the joy of this culture and it’s people.

4. The Ganges

The Ganges, or Ganga, is the holiest river in the world. It runs from the northern Himalaya all the way to the Bay of Bengal. But it is much more than just a river to the one billion Hindus. They believe it transports prayers to heaven and that a dip in the river purifies the soul.

Kumbh Mela, Haridwar, India

5. Ranthambhore National Park

With an area of 400 sq. km encompassing rocky hill crests which descend to open valleys between the Aravalli and Vindhya ranges, dotted with water pools and fruit trees, this park gets its name from the thousand year old fortress, which looms above the forest. Ranthambore is a very special and unusual area where a natural present meets a historical past.

Barasingha, Ranthambhore National Park, India

It is also well known for the diurnal activity of the sixth reason to travel with me to India:

6. Tigers

Tiger safaris traditionally take place at dawn and dusk when the big cats are on the move, sometimes hunting. Naturalist guides use their hearing rather than their site to initially find tigers: when chital and monkeys sense a tiger approaching they give a distinctive warning call that alerts the wildlife (and our guides) to the tiger’s approximate location.

Close-up of tiger in tall grass, Ranthambhore National Park, India

7. The Chaos

Learning to embrace the chaos is an important part of any trip to India. Learning to relax and be at peace with all your senses being overloaded will give you a much greater understanding of the culture.

Along the waterfront of Varanasi, an ancient city on the Ganges river, the timeless tradition of gathering and bathing in the sacred waters is still prevalent. The Ganges, which originates in the nearby Himalaya, is believed to transport water that purifies the soul for the multitudes of Hindus that live along its course.

8. Spirituality

India is home to all of the major religions of the world and is the birthplace of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism. Observing people engaging in their rituals is a profoundly intimate experience.

Candle, Kumbh Mela, Haridwar, India

9. The History

Home to the world’s oldest civilization, the religion, culture and architecture of India have evolved under multiple influences creating a visual feast.

Jagat Shri Brahma Temple, Pushkar, India

10. Adventure

Early in my career people told me not to bother going to India – they said it had nothing to offer and I should focus elsewhere. So for over a decade that’s what I did. Worst advice ever! Once I finally saw India with my own eyes—I’ve been back just about every year since and I’ve still just scratched the surface of it’s beautiful, complex and wonderful variety of culture, nature, landscape and wildlife.

Even as they go about their daily work, the women of the Thar Desert wear beautiful tooled jewelry and colorful dress. Occasionally, they’ll gather into groups to discuss a range of subjects from how lazy their men are to village politics. During the long dry season, they’ll routinely paint beautiful designs upon their adobe walls and courtyard floors adding a bit of beauty to the otherwise monochromatic world.

What are you waiting for? Sign up to guarantee your spot to travel with me to one of the great and historic regions of the world!

mountain ridge

New Photos from Namibia!


What’s become an annual trip to Namibia was particularly great this year, with different views of Sossusvlei, great wildlife views in Etosha National Park, and fun with abstracts at an old diamond-mining ghost town slowly being inundated with sand. The quiver tree forest was spectacular too, though the moon was full when we were there which somewhat inhibited photographing the Milky Way at night. I also came away with some great new elephant shots for the upcoming book project. Enjoy!

I am leading another Namibia tour in August 2020. You can get on the preregistration list now to be the first notified when trip details are posted. This trip will sell out, don’t miss out!

mountain ridge

New Photos from Botswana!

I had an amazing session with Elephants a few days ago in Botswana! I spent hours in a stuffy, sunken blind, but was rewarded late in the afternoon when several elephant herds began to show up for a drink and a splash. It was about ninety degrees here, and they played in the cooling waters just five feet in front of us. The elephants were very aware of us and we were splashed intentionally many times – we had a major cleaning session afterwards since the churned water had turned to liquid mud.

This lasted for over an hour and I shot thousands of frames; the results are full of the personality and affection these amazing animals possess.

The  task of editing has been daunting to say the least. I am working on a book with fellow UW alum & biologist Sam Wasser, who has been instrumental in using DNA to track endangered species, especially orcas and elephants, and now  Dr. Wasser is trying to use DNA to track illegal shipments of ivory and shut down major poaching cartels. It makes my work look easy by comparison, and those of us who work with and care for the well being of these animals and their place in the world are so very grateful for his work.

mountain ridge