New Photos from Greenland


My staff was thrilled that I finally was traveling to a new location: the world’s largest island, Greenland. Our Luminous Landscape group met in Svalbard, and from there sailed across the misty Greenland Sea and down the eastern coast of Northeast Greenland National Park. We were able to make Zodiac landings to explore the rugged landscape that was already turning autumn copper and red. The immense icebergs were the true rock stars of the journey, and we felt dwarfed by their stories-tall spires. They are dangerous as well; if you are too close when one rolls over -and they do- they could swamp and kill a boatload of people. In the final days of the trip I was able to capture some the most spectacularly perfect reflections I have ever seen – truly a fantasy world of ice.

See more photos from this shoot on my stock site, and remember – save 20% on just about any of my images as a print through this month only with the Pick-Your-Print of the Month!

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Human Canvas Now Online at The Art of Wild Gallery

Based in Germany with clients worldwide, The Art of Wild Gallery is very proud and happy to represent many of the images of my Human Canvas project. I feel the Human Canvas is the culmination of my artistic endeavors, a body of work that combines my work with traditional cultures, camouflage, and art into a photographic whole.
Using art and its presentation as a vehicle of analysis, inspiration and emotional engagement The Art of Wild Gallery contributes to the discourse about the relationship between man and nature. Presenting a high-class selection of well-curated, visually stimulating and thoughtful bodies of work and artists that focus on this relationship, The Art of Wild Gallery wishes to accentuate art’s role in reflecting critically, emotionally and creatively to a changing world.

 

 

 

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Technique Tuesday: Using Flash for Better Detail

Sometimes you may need to shoot a moving subject in lighting that isn’t ideal. Add in a longer lens and extension tubes to create the composition you want, and you may need to add a flash to capture effective detail. Shot on location in Manu National Park, Peru.

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Pick Your Print of the Month – 20% Off in September!

Through the month of September save 20% off on (almost!) our entire collection of images! See something YOU think would be a great print that we haven’t listed in our collection? Visit our stock site and peruse all of our images and find something uniquely yours, or cross some early holiday shopping off your list for that special someone!

Here’s how:

  1. Visit www.artwolfestock.com
  2. Browse images, check out the various galleries, or search for that perfect image
  3. Note the image name for the selected file – example “tanzania_160627_I8259.tif”
  4. Fill out the contact form found here with “Print Sale” as the subject, and the image name in your message.
  5. Don’t forget to check the Newsletter sign-up box to receive a 5$ coupon and be notified of future sales and to be kept up to date with Art’s latest travels and photographs!

20% off is only valid on print sizes 16″ x 20″ and above with pricing as follows:

16 x 20″: $480 $384
20 x 30″: $900 $720
30 x 40″: $1800 $1440
40 x 60″: $3600 $2880

Come across an image of Art’s you love that you can’t locate on the stock site, or have a special request for sizing? No worries – email your inquiry to info@artwolfe.com and we can help.

The fine print:

Open edition prints only. A select number of images on the stock site are not available for purchase as a print. Limited edition prints are excluded from this offer. We will notify you if the image you’ve selected isn’t available and can suggest similar alternatives to meet your needs.

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Art Wolfe Grant Winner Andrew Snyder

Excellent photos and inspiring words from Andrew Snyder regarding our trip to Katmai, Alaska! Andrew was a recipient of the Luminous Endowment’s Art Wolfe Next-Generation Photographer’s Grant. His essay is full of some great tips and insights from Katmai – give it a read!

The Luminous Endowment provides grants to photographers world-wide to pursue photographic projects. Learn how you can apply for the various upcoming grants they provide.

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Where’s Art? Episode 7 – Shi Shi Beach, Washington State

In this edition of Where’s Art?, I’m in my home state of Washington, visting the Olympic National Park – specifically Shi Shi beach, located in the northwestern most corner of the contiguous United States, to capture the rocky and rugged coastline that can be found here. We shot at all hours of the day and into the night, as photographing the stars over the shoreline in this location so far removed from the bright lights of any major city for an upcoming book project was my primary goal here.

I hope you enjoy this episode of Where’s Art?, and stay tuned as I am currently in Greenland where we will record another episode very soon!

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New Photos from Shi Shi Beach, Washington


Last weekend I had the opportunity to hike and camp on Olympic National Park’s glorious Shi Shi Beach. Although I visit the Olympic Peninsula several times a year, this was the first time in decades that I had been to this particular area. There were no longer any squatters there escaping the Vietnam draft, but there were quite a few intrepid campers like us, out to enjoy the end of the summer, do some hiking, and in our case, photography.

Check out the entire photo shoot at www.artwolfestock.com and stay tuned for the next installment of “Where’s Art?” in which I will discuss photographing in this part of the world!

 

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Technique Tuesday – Quick Tip for Shooting in Harsh Conditions

When shooting in harsh conditions, it’s important to keep your equipment protected. Avoid exposing your camera’s image sensor to dirt and the elements by avoiding changing lenses in the field when conditions may be problematic. Having multiple camera bodies with a range of lenses attached keeps the sensor from being exposed, with the added benefit of allowing for quickly capturing different looks for your images by simply grabbing your second camera.

As you know, I am all about capturing a unique and compelling image regardless of your equipment. However, if you’re going to invest in the time to travel and photograph amazing places it pays to be prepared. If you’re looking into a second camera body, consider checking out some of the used equipment on the B&H website or your local camera stores. Be sure to pick something up that’s compatible with your current lenses. Although the latest and greatest cameras offer some spectacular features, finding a backup camera body in a range that fits your budget will ensure you never miss a shot!

Don’t forget that you can also rent camera bodies and lenses as well! Your local camera shops may rent equipment, and there are websites like borrowlenses.com that will ship rentals to you. This can be a great way to try before you buy, or simply ensure you have the best gear available if you’ve already invested money into traveling and participating in photo workshops.

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Throwback Thursday – Solar Eclipse, South Australia


All this run up to the solar eclipse on August 21st makes me hark back to when I traveled to South Australia back in December 2002 to photograph a total eclipse there. At the time, I was photographing landscapes for my book Edge of the Earth, Corner of the Sky and I thought this would be an amazing opportunity. I’d seen many technically excellent photographs of total eclipses over the years, but quite honestly they all looked pretty much alike. My objective became capturing the eclipse in relation to the Earth.

The solar eclipse that occurred on December 4, 2002, was noteworthy when viewed in South Australia for a couple of reasons. First, the eclipse was unusually brief at 25 seconds. Also, it occurred less than 40 minutes before sunset, so the likelihood of an obscured view was greatly increased because clouds generally stack up along the horizon at that time of day. To maximize my chance of success, I decided to find the precise position from which to film the eclipse by experimenting exactly 24 hours before the eclipse. I also decided to try two cameras for two very different perspectives, so I used both a wide-angle and a 70–200mm lens, enabling me to take full advantage of the eclipse’s late hour by incorporating the landscape.

Most eclipses occur earlier in the day when the sun is much higher in the sky. For this book, I wanted to establish the connection of the eclipse with the Earth. I wanted the viewer to witness the eclipse as if they were standing there next to me under the gum trees. Since I could not determine exposure until totality began, I decided to use matrix metering on an automatic aperture priority setting. When totality began, I would simply engage the shutter using locking cable releases, hoping that the entire roll of film would run continuously through the camera. This would have happened had I not made one final decision: to auto-bracket my exposures. I discovered, too late, that the camera would not continuously advance while on the auto-bracket setting. After just three exposures, both cameras stopped advancing. By the time I figured out what was happening, totality ended. Fortunately, I did get proper exposures for both compositions. After the critical moment of the full eclipse, I continued to photograph as the eclipse continued, switching to other lenses and film.

To create these images I used two Canon cameras, an EOS-1N and an EOS-1N/RS, EF70-200mm and EF 16-35mm lenses, Fujichrome Provia 400 film, and a Gitzo tripods. For the images of the setting eclipse on the horizon, I used an EF500mm IS lens and Fujichrome Velvia film.

For viewing the eclipse next week, make sure to protect your eyes properly, I cannot stress this enough! B&H has a bunch of articles up on their Explora blog on how to protect yourself and how to photograph the event. If you can’t see it in person, the best view will be via NASA livestream.

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Where’s Art? Episode 6 – Katmai, Alaska

I’m pleased to bring you an extended edition of “Where’s Art?” this week, as my long history with a location that never ceases to provide new opportunities means I have a lot to say and a lot to show! Hopefully you enjoy this episode – and if it piques your interest to get out into the wilderness of Alaska with me, be sure to sign up for my 2018 trips here as they WILL sell out!

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