Workshop Wednesday – “Photography As Art” in Tampa, Montreal & New York!

Photography As Art is just around the corner on the East Coast and Canada! On Sunday, May 20th I’ll be in Tampa, Florida and then the weekend of June 2nd and 3rd I’ll be in Montreal and New York respectively – sign up today to ensure your spot!

This seminar is designed to completely change the way you view photography, and my intent is to inspire you to bring unique artistic visions to life using your camera as both brush and canvas. With an emphasis on the abstract, imaginary landscapes, and capturing metaphors the lessons learned here can be applied anywhere and with whatever equipment you have available – no globe-trotting or a plethora of fancy gear required.

If you’ve attended the seminar before, this would be a great refresher as I’ve spent much of the down time I had at home this past winter revising, adding, and updating. Though I am continually working to improve the messaging and adding new photos from current shoots, this break was the first time I’ve been able to really sit down and completely fine tune what has become a popular and requested seminar – if I haven’t been to your city yet, leave a comment below!

Photography As Art Will also be coming to the Keystone State in June, with seminars in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh on the 9th and 10th respectively – stay tuned for more details!

Art Wolfe Presents: Photography As Art


Tampa, FL – Sunday May 20th

Montreal, Quebec – Saturday June 2nd

New York City – Sunday June 3rd

Philadelphia, PA – Saturday June 9th

Pittsburgh, PA – Sunday June 10th

 

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Travel Tuesday – Take the Art Wolfe Travel Survey!

For those of you who missed the first round of the travel survey, there is still time to weigh in with your opinion on upcoming workshops! Click the link below to make your voice heard – and if a destination you’d like to visit isn’t on the list, there’s a space to include your own feedback.

Art Wolfe Travel Survey – May 2018

And to those of you who have already put in your two cents, a heart-felt thank you from me and my staff. Great location choices, and they amazingly lined up with some of the destinations I had already planned to get to for special projects. Hence, we may be adding time to those trips or opening them up for those who want to join me on an upcoming photo adventure.

Stay tuned to our events page as we’ll list these special trips in the very near future, or if you’d like to sign up for something already on the list – we are getting to the point where many of the remaining 2018 workshops will begin selling out!

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Workshop Wednesday – Columbia River Gorge & Oregon Coast

Mid to late June is a beautiful time to visit the Pacific Northwest, and for that reason we have a pair of workshops happening here with only a few spaces remaining!

Columbia River Gorge workshop – June 14 – 17

Join Art Wolfe in the beautiful Columbia River Gorge, which is arguably one of the most beautiful attractions in the Pacific Northwest! The wide range of elevation and precipitation makes the Columbia River Gorge an extremely diverse and dynamic place, and therefore the photographic opportunities are endless. Explore the Gorge with Gavriel as it transitions between temperate rainforest to dry grasslands in only 80 miles, hosting a dramatic change in scenery.

The field locations will not be limited to the scenic beauty of the Pacific Northwest, Art will also take the group to some locations that will provide opportunities to photograph abstract images as well.

We will also have 6 stop Neutral Density filters for the entire group to try out while photographing long exposures. For one portion of the worksop the group will be taken to a lesser known waterfall for night photography!

Oregon Coast Workshop – June 21 – 24

Along Oregon’s historic and scenic coast, this will be a weekend of imagination! the Oregon Coast has so much to offer with the beautiful waterfalls and ocean landscapes, as well as opportunities for unique intimate landscapes and abstracts. This workshop is slightly different than my popular “Abstract Astoria” workshop as we will focus more on the ocean and landscape photography with a hint of abstracts.

A single image can have the power to stimulate the imagination and the intellect while also telling a story that awakens the senses. Our challenge is to explore the nature of creativity itself and discover ways to bring its power to your images.

 

 

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Technique Tuesday – Canon EF15mm f/2.8 Fisheye Lens


In the field there are times when a standard lens is inadequate to capture a subject as you would like to portray it. Often I will use a 15mm fisheye to create more interesting angles and more dynamic compositions. This lens can improve the statement of a subject by changing the relationship of elements in the picture. Getting up close with this lens lends a strong sense of depth to a composition. Some say it distorts reality, but really you are changing the way you are perceiving perspective. The lens defines this way of looking for us and creates a fascinating relationship of foreground and background. Standard focal lengths can be boring! Take that step out of the ordinary.

Here are a few tips when shooting with a fisheye lens:

• Know your subject, and keep the composition simple – the distortion is already going to make your image more complicated. Make sure your subject stands out!

• Try different heights and angles – where you shoot from can intensify or lessen the fisheye effect.

• Fisheye lenses allow a lot of light to enter making them useful for night photography – therefore they can be great for shooting stars.

• Look for normally straight lines that will bend with the lens and lead the eye through your photograph

• Often I tell people not to put the subject in the center of the frame, but intentionally centering up a subject and using symmetry with a fisheye lens can often create a compelling image.

• When shooting in close quarters, a fisheye lens can be used to capture the elements that a normal lens would crop away. You can then either keep the distorted view, or use software like Adobe Lightroom to correct the effect and remove most if not all the distortion.

• Get close to your subject – a fisheye lens will bring so much of the surrounding detail into the frame, you can get much closer to your subject than you normally would.

For more tips and tricks, check out my technique books, “The Art of the Photograph” and “The New Art of Photographing Nature“.

 

 

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Happy Arbor Day! Pre-Order “Trees: Between Earth and Heaven” Today!

Today is Arbor day, a wonderful occasion to celebrate the significance of trees world-wide. The importance of trees both in terms of their impact on habitats and cultures can’t be stated enough but often goes overlooked. Check out arborday.org for more info on what you can do to participate this weekend!

This is also a good time to mention my newest upcoming book which has been available for pre-order for a few weeks. It’s called “Trees: Between Heaven and Earth“, and it will be available this fall. It’s full of beautiful photos of trees from around the world and details their beauty and contributions to habitats, cultures and much much more.

There are sample pages to check out on my online store, and don’t forget that all pre-orders through the site will be signed by yours truly before being sent your way!

Have a wonderful weekend, get out there and plant something!

 

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New Photos from the Sea of Cortez!


This past week I set out on an adventure with good friends to the Sea of Cortez and we were not disappointed. Aboard a boat with an excellent crew, we were treated to a variety of creatures quite literally great and small –  pilot whales, dolphins, a variety of rays, and much more. A blue whale made an appearance, it’s massive size not quite apparent until we had a drone in the air.

Among the other revelations gleaned from having the ‘eye in the sky’ came when a leaping ray caught our eye. We sent the drone over to capture it from above, only to find it was just one particularly active member of a large fever of rays – a pleasant and unexpected surprise!

Enjoy the slide show, and stay tuned for more photos from several upcoming trips. My schedule is filling up, but it’s nice to be back out there!

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20% Off the Print Of The Month – Hot Springs Zen

Save 20% on the Print of the Month – Hot Springs Zen. Captured on my trip to Honshu Island, Japan in February of 2013 I feel this shot perfectly represents much of what has been discovered about the Japanese Macaques, or snow monkeys, and their relationship with the hot springs in this location. According to this recent New York Times article, the monkeys use the hot baths to warm up and reduce their stress levels, much like I do when I hop in the hot tub after a long stretch of travel!

Purchase Hot Springs Zen in the online store for this special sale price!

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Technique Tuesday – Art On Art!


Years back, student Angels Gazquez Espuny of Spain interviewed Art a few years back for a school project. The title was “The Artist’s Psychology”, and considering that Art has made his Photography As Art seminar a continued exploration into the subject matter in the years since, it seemed like a timely re-post! Enjoy!

  • From your experience, what is art and what is an artist?

A true artist is an individual who creates from their soul be they a musician, writer, dancer, sculptor, painter or photographer etc…They have a need to express themselves in a creative way, revealing a part of themselves in the process. To restrict their creative outlet, whatever it may be, whether they sell their work or not, is to imprison their soul.

Art is a journey, for both the artist and the viewer. An artist will grow and mature over time. Myself, I began with a more realist approach to my painting and photography and have trended towards a greater appreciation for the abstract as I have followed my own journey. The same is true for the viewer. At one point in your life you may not ‘get it’ when you look at another’s artwork; perhaps it is too abstract or unusual; but later in life you may return to these same pieces and see them from an entirely new perspective, appreciating them in a way you couldn’t have before. Everyone sees and interprets art from their own experiences. It is because of this that you can’t simply define “art” or an “artist”, each is an ever changing and growing interpretation for the individual.

For me personally, the highest form of art is something that enriches the viewer and speaks to them evoking an emotional response from within. I fill my home with art, both my own and pieces I have collected during my travels all over the world. Some are highly prized pieces such as centuries old Native American baskets but  they run all they way down to simple indigenous crafts I have picked up for a few dollars. I have even transformed my yard over the years into a work of art inspired by the Chinese paintings of the Haung Shan landscapes.

I am an artist, I have been since a child. It was when I was a young boy in middle school the teachers, upon seeing my paintings, were so moved, that they actually paid me for my work. It was right then that I knew I would make a living selling my art, my creations, and I have followed that path ever since. My roots are set deeply in painting. I went to the University of Washington receiving my degree in Fine Arts and I saw this as my path. It was only in my 20s that I would transition to a photography and make my name as a wildlife photographer and in my journey, now at 60 years old, I find myself returning to my roots as a painter more and more.

  • Why and what motivates you to create, what do you normally create?

As I said before, I am an artist and I have that same drive inside me that all true artists feel which continues to motivate me even after nearly 40 years. When I return from a trip my mind is instantly seeking out the next opportunity – whether it is with my camera in the field, a studio session, or time with paint and a brush, as an artist I will never rest.

I have always been a strong conservationist, even as a child. I grew up spending more time outside than inside exploring the woods near my home in West Seattle, Washington getting to know every bird, reptile, mammal, and plant I could find. At a young age I could see the need to protect and preserve our fragile natural resources. I strive to capture the natural beauty in works of art with the hope that it will inspire the viewer, evoke that emotional response, to see the need to preserve and protect our diminishing resources.

In my career as a photographer, I first began photographing animals and landscapes and that is perhaps what I am most well known for. Over the years, traveling the world, I was fortunate enough to encounter the elusive animals that inhabit the remote corners of our planet, and at the same time I got to know and appreciate the indigenous people that inhabit these lands as well. Their culture in many cases remains intact as it has been for countless generations. Getting to know these cultures, fostered an appreciation for the beauty of their approach to life and balance with the planet. With a career spanning over 30 years, I have images in my archive that can not be replicated today as cultures give way to outside influences.

Traveling the world I have also been exposed to a wide variety of religions and practices giving me an appreciation for the beauty you can find in each. Over time I have found myself bringing home more and more creations around culture and religion from these travels.

Lastly, as I get older I find myself drawn more and more to the abstract. The photographs you find me taking today are less often about the grand scenic landscape and more often about intimate details, abstracting the elements in the natural world to tell a different kind of story, but one rooted in the same motivation for protecting and preserving the natural wonders of our planet.

  • Do you think an artist is born or grows with age?

I believe both statements are true. One is born with certain passions in their soul. No matter your level of physical fitness, if you don’t have a passion to climb mountains, you won’t be a mountain climber, that is a drive I believe you have deep inside of you and an artist’s drive is no different. You are born with this drive to create though not necessarily the talent to pull it off, for talent comes with time. This is how an artist grows with age. Some may be self-taught, others classically trained, and it’s the rare exception that may be inherently talented, but even with those, I would argue that you can see their work grow and transform over time as they follow their journey.

Whether your art form is photography, painting, music, whatever…talk with any artist and they will tell you of a journey where they grew as an artist, honing their craft, focusing their talents, changing with time and improving with each creation.

And I continue to evolve, I have taken photos in the last 3 years that I never would have seen just 5 years ago – at 60 years old I continue to get better, look objectively at my art, improve on it and move forward, never stagnating. I will be growing as an artist so long as I am still able to create.

  • Do you have any reference artists & what inspires you?

I am inspired by the works of many classical and contemporary artists. You will see direct evidence of influences from Jackson Pollack in my work in a composition showcasing the random line and chaos which can be found in nature. I have also long admired the work of dutch artist M.C. Escher. I have photographs that I explicitly composed with his repeating geographic patterns in mind such as the repeating black and white of a tightly composed image of penguins in the artic. As I am photographing in the field, a scene will unfold before me reminding me of a particular artist’s style and I will compose my image drawing upon this style.

As a lifetime student of art, the list of artists inspiring me is a long one. You’ll find all the usual suspects such as Salvador Dali, Renoir, Van Gogh as well as more contemporary artists such as Keith Haring, Jacob Lawrence, Mark Toby… To visit my library at home would provide you an understanding as it is filled with art books spanning the centuries, it would be far too difficult to try and list everyone I draw from here.
Additionally I am also influence and inspired by the original artists, those who left their art on rock and cave walls 10-30 thousand years ago in Australia, southwestern US and the caves of Spain and France. They were true artists abstracting their subjects, suggesting movement and exaggerating their features. They were not simply recoding exactly what they saw, they were creating art.

Lastly, I am inspired by the beauty of nature. The intricate designs you find everywhere you look, from a curled fiddle wad of a young fern to the beautiful colors in the wings of a McCaw. This is why I keep doing what I do, I love nature and all her beauty and I want to share this with everyone in the hopes that they too will fall in love and understand why we need to protect this precious gift.

  • Do you consider yourself an artist?

Absolutely. Art is my passion and I have been following that passion my entire life.

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New Photos from Georgia!


Last week I shared a terrific few days with fellow photographers in Atlanta, Georgia. We were able to get to a couple very gritty and unsettling locations, but the results were well worth any discomfort – psychological or physical. We even had local law enforcement provide a security escort through one location, though I was more weary of the spirits and specters hiding in the corner of these extra-creepy locations than anything a security guard may have been able to handle!

Thrills and chills aside, our group was able to explore some immensely unique locations and come away with unique shots that I guarantee won’t be confused for your run-of-the-mill travel photographs. I had a fantastic time on this trip, and the talented insightful participants as well as our local support made for a welcome return to workshops after my brief but necessary hiatus.

I am looking forward to scheduling more Abstract field workshops, and your input is always welcome. Abstract NOLA comes to mind! If you have any suggestions on somewhere you’ve visited or even a location in your own home town that would provide opportunities for a great abstract workshop, let me know in the comments! I’m constantly looking for new places to explore, and word of mouth is the best way to find them!

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Travel Tuesday – Art’s Travel Tips!

Now that I’m getting back to traveling, I’m reminded of all the details that come along with doing so – and some tips that can make the whole process a lot less stressful! Since it’s top of mind, I figured I would share on this #TravelTuesday!

•If you travel more than six times a year, it is worthwhile to get Global Entry, Nexus (US & Canada only) or TSA Precheck (domestic only)

•Have a detailed packing list and start packing well in advance of your trip so you have time to obtain any necessary items, such as prescriptions, before you go. Don’t forget your adapters, cables, and extra batteries for all your devices! A portable power pack is a good way to ensure you won’t run out of juice if you’re unable to charge your devices.

Check the CDC for any necessary immunizations you might need before your travels.

Check the US State Department website for any travel alerts

•Acclimatization is critical. Set your watch to the local time of your destination. Try to sleep on the plane or stay awake depending upon the time. Use earplugs, noise cancelling headphones, and eyepatches.

•Flying with expensive camera gear. Take your camera bag with the majority of your gear in the plane cabin with you. Check big, heavy lenses.

•Enroll in STEP — Smart Traveler Enrollment Program — with the State Department before your overseas trip. If you lose your passport, this will make it much easier to get a new one. Always carry a photocopy of your passport.

•Always get trip insurance. Yes, insurance is a gamble. It will add expense to your trip, but it may save you a bundle as well!

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