Sign Up Now for Lightroom 3 with Jay Goodrich

Do your raw images look like this? by Jay Goodrich
Do your raw images look like this? © Jay Goodrich

Have you ever wondered how to make your photographic life easier? Maybe you are not so sure of how to master an image on a global scale? Or on a targeted scale? Or what if you have 100, 1,000, or 10,000 images on you computer, but don’t know how to retrieve them in a matter of minutes when an editor calls? You need to start using Adobe’s Lightroom 3. One of the best image management/processing softwares available today. This May our workshop instructor Jay Goodrich is going to teach you how in a 2-day class that will answer all of the above questions and more.

What if you could create this with only Lightroom 3 by Jay Goodrich
What if you could create this with only Lightroom 3 © Jay Goodrich

The Lightroom 3 Workflow–This workshop is designed for all photographers who want to simplify their workflow and archiving processes. This class will focus on helping you use Lightroom to organize, optimize and output your images. Jay will guide you through the modules and show you ways to create workflows that streamline your image making process. He will share his own personal workflow and how he manages thousands of images. This is a class not to be missed. In addition, this course is being taught at the Art Wolfe Gallery in Downtown Seattle, Washington. Don’t delay this class has limited enrollment.
Dates : May14-15, 2011 Price : $395.00

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Art of Composition Coming to Chicago

Art is bringing his popular one-day seminar THE ART OF COMPOSITION to Chicago—well, Elgin to be exact.  This program will fill fast so don’t delay. We look forward to seeing you there!

March 19, 2011, 10am-4pm @ Elgin Community College

>>Visit our Website for more Info

>>Chicago Brochure

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25th Anniversary of Outdoor Photographer

I am so honored to have my image of the Chamonix Needles  as the cover of Outdoor Photographer’s 25th Anniversary issue.

I have been working with Outdoor Photographer since its inception in 1985 and to this day it remains the finest publication of its kind, inspiring enthusiasts and pros alike to make better images.

Congratulations, OP!

BLOG: 25th Anniversary of Outdoor Photographer – Images by Art Wolfe

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The Art of Composition Seminar Tour Participant Trevor Peterson Reviews His Experience

Huang Shan, China © Art Wolfe

This review was originally posted on The Luminous Landscape website. For more information on the upcoming tours click here.

Recently, I had the pleasure of attending Art Wolfe’s The Art of Composition seminar in New York. Mr. Wolfe is currently presenting in a number of cities across the US and Canada. Those living in the New York City area are fortunate, in that many photographers come through on the lecture circuit. Whenever I can make the time, I try to attend these seminars, as one always learns something from each speaker. I have been a fan of Mr. Wolfe’s work for years, and made sure I kept the day free for his seminar.

Mr. Wolfe’s six-hour seminar was very different from others that I have attended. Rather than spending time on the nuts and bolts of photography, Art focused on the artistry of the craft. Trained as a painter, and an educator, Mr. Wolfe tackled subjects that are very hard to teach, namely, inspiration, passion, vision, and ultimately, composition. The first lecture of the day was more art theory class than photography lecture. It made you really THINK about the images presented. What Mr. Wolfe spent the day doing, was giving his students a new set of tools to help SEE a photograph.

Mr. Wolfe is an engaging speaker, and with his background in television with “Travels to the Edge”, knows how to hold an audience and work with it. It made for a well paced day. Art drew on almost four decades of images, shot in literally every corner of the globe. The breadth of geography and subject matter was truly impressive. Although Mr. Wolfe made his name in wildlife and nature photography, his cultural photography, still lifes, and abstract compositions show his true breadth as an artist. Drawing on the sheer scale of this body of work allowed the seminar participant to see a concept illustrated across a number of photographic disciplines, allowing one to see how lessons were relevant to their own photography.

If you live near one of the cities where Art will be speaking next, I highly recommend taking the time to attend this seminar. Photographers of all skill levels can learn something from a true master of the craft.

May, 2010

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About the Author:


Trevor Peterson is a passionate photographer, whose work focuses primarily on cultural photography. Unfortunately, his photography frequently has to take a back seat to his primary career as a private equity professional.

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Constructing the Composition: Angkor Wat

Angkor Wat, Cambodia, ©Art WolfeArt has detailed the steps that he goes through in order to create his final image compositions here on the blog. He now has a brand new series from Angkor Wat that you can view over at Luminous Landscape.

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Icebergs – Working a Composition

Icebergs and ice are an increasingly important topic in recent years, as climate change is becoming more of a resounding, everyday issue. On a recent trip to Antarctica I developed a personal project of capturing the ice in as artistic of a way as possible. During the day, cruise ship passengers disembarked in Zodiacs to go ashore and view penguins. I have photographed a lot of penguins, so my mission became the ice that was floating in the vicinity. On this particular trip I asked a Zodiac driver to take me over to a distant iceberg that I could see towering over all of the other icebergs. It looked almost like a cathedral, standing out there over a 150 feet above its surrounding neighbors.

iceberg image 1

This first image shows the dramatic angle of the pinnacle of ice as it’s surrounded by smaller icebergs. As usual I circled my subject and look at it from all angles before settling on an image.

iceberg image 2

As we travel around the iceberg it takes on a slightly different shape. This new vantage point allows me to incorporate more of the surrounding icebergs in the foreground.

iceberg image 3

With image number three I am able to incorporate a foreground “bergie bit” (little piece of iceberg) that is found floating around its larger cousins. I am using a 16-35mm wide angle zoom lens and a polarizer to compose this image. My main objective is to balance the foreground ice with the iceberg in the distance.

iceberg image 4

I put on my 70-200mm zoom and circled back around to the location where I captured my initial composition in image 1. I chose to shoot a vertical to emphasize the vertical sweep of this dramatic iceberg.

iceberg image 5

I noticed a distant iceberg with an arch and directed the Zodiac to it. As we headed over to it I put my wide angle zoom back on. I circled this iceberg looking for a point of view in which to include with my initial perspective.

iceberg image 6

This composition reveals the first iceberg in a very beautiful way. I also love the way the green arch surrounds the distant blue icebergs, and how the wide angle gives the image a nice perspective by incorporating some of the blue green ice just below the surface.

iceberg image 7

I decided to go back to my 70-200 to try to pull in that distant iceberg. This lens allowed me to compress the scene while still keeping the strong foreground element of the arched iceberg in my composition. However, because I am further away now, you can see the blue sky above the arched iceberg. I have lost the drama that I had with the last image.

iceberg image 8

I zoomed in to try and eliminate the sky from the previous shot,but in doing so I have lost the top of the distant iceberg.

iceberg image 9

This is my favorite image in the series. It conveys the drama of the arch, it frames the iceberg in the distance perfectly, and it has a nice sense of color with the blues and greens.

The result is 3 or 4 distinctly different compositions of the same iceberg, which demonstrates how perseverance and a change of perspective can yield a stronger set of images.

Learn these and other techniques in our upcoming spring seminar tour to seven major cities throughout the U.S. and Canada. For more information visit the Art Wolfe Workshop Website.



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The Eagle Hunters – Working a Composition

Eagle Hunters Image-1 © Art Wolfe

This, the first series of images in a new section on our blog, involves Kazakh eagle hunters in western Mongolia.

These are a very strong people that have a strong sense of culture. One of those cultural icons is hunting with eagles. I wanted to get a shot that really conveys the sense of spacious land in Mongolia, the power of the eagle, and the traditional dress that seems to be seen less and less in the historical cultures of the world today. This first photo basically establishes where we are – two eagle hunters, a horse, and the eagle traversing an open slope on the border of western Mongolia and Kazakhstan.

Eagle Hunters Image-2 © Art Wolfe

In this second photo you actually see how close I am to my subjects. I am using my Canon 1Ds Mark III camera with a 16-35 wide angle zoom lens, which allows me to include a strong foreground subject (the hunters) as well as the dramatic sky in the distance. Also note that the light looks a bit flat in this shot, but from the viewpoint from which I am taking the photo things look completely different.

Eagle Hunters Image-3 © Art Wolfe

In my third image, which is at a right angle to the direction of the sun, I have attached a polarizer to my wide angle. You can see how much more dramatic the light appears. This image also highlights the problems of working with dramatic light – very harsh shadows were cast every time the eagle moved its wings.

Eagle Hunters Image-4 © Art Wolfe

The wing of the eagle is now down, but the man that’s controlling the eagle is casting a shadow on his assistant.

Eagle Hunters Image-5 © Art Wolfe

I decided to get lower and shoot upwards to bring in some of the openness of the sky in hopes of creating  more of a story than in the previous shots.

Eagle Hunters Image-6 © Art Wolfe

The result is that I don’t have nearly the problems of the previous images with the shadows. This is a very satisfying image to me, but in an effort to see what else is achievable, I begin working the scene a bit more.

Eagle Hunters Image-7 © Art Wolfe

I’m standing at eye level again with the hunters, but the problem with this shot  is that the man closet to me is staring straight at me. I try to maintain a little anonymity when I am taking pictures, and would prefer that the subject is not staring straight into my camera.

Eagle Hunters Image-8 © Art Wolfe

I ask him to look straight ahead, but now with movement of doing so, the eagle is staring straight at me. This isn’t necessarily a bad composition, but I would prefer the eagle in a different position.

Eagle Hunters Image-9 © Art Wolfe

I move a little bit further around and discover I love the way the light is falling across the main eagle hunter and his beautiful fox fur hat. However, as you can see, I have moved in too close to get all three in the frame.

Eagle Hunters Image-10 © Art Wolfe

I decide to back off a little bit, and now I am getting what I am looking for. I love the fact that the man in the middle is kind of looking my way, the assistant is looking off to his left, and the eagle is conversely looking off in the opposite direction. There is a nice balance to this image, with no shadows on their faces. In addition, the eagle has nice light on his eye. This to me is a winner.

Eagle Hunters Image-11 © Art Wolfe

I also like this last photo because it has a nice sense to it; the eagle is looking further opposite now, and is even more absorbed in what is going on in the landscape, rather than in what the photographer is busy trying to achieve. Both of these final two images are very strong photos for me, and I am very happy with the results:

good balance of compositon, dramatic light, openness of the land, traditional wardrobes – it all comes together in a very nice way in these last two images.

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