Search results

Technique Tuesday: Scale of your Subject | Art Wolfe

The following is an excerpt from “The New Art of Photographing Nature“. Pick it up in my online store and check a gift off your list for the photographer in your life! SCALE:  HOW LARGE SHOULD THE SUBJECT BE? AW: In these three shots of a spotted owl, we see how the owl changes in Read more…

Technique Tuesday: Making Order out of Chaos | Art Wolfe

The following is an excerpt from “The New Art of Photographing Nature”, and for more photos of the natural world, specifically magnificent trees world-wide, check out my latest recently published book “Trees: Between Earth & Heaven”! MAKING ORDER OUT OF CHAOS The elements that go into making a good image are basically the same for Read more…

Technique Tuesday: Rhythms From the Wild | Art Wolfe

Today’s high ISO cameras are amazing at freezing motion, a technique I use and love on any wildlife shoot these days I have been capturing images that I couldn’t have imagined in the days of film – or even 8-10 years ago, for that matter. Flying bears, macaws tack sharp against a dark cave, every Read more…

Technique Tuesday: Photographing Reflections | Art Wolfe

This excerpt is from “Photographs from the Edge”, which not only details the stories behind some of my most well-known captures from across the globe and throughout my career, but is also filled with tips and tricks and equipment information. June 2013: Canyon Wall Reflection, Kimberley, Australia Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF 24-105mm f/4 Read more…

Technique Tuesday: Capturing Wildlife in the Moment | Art Wolfe

This excerpt is from “Photographs from the Edge”, which not only details the stories behind some of my most well-known captures from across the globe and throughout my career, but is also filled with tips and tricks and equipment information. July 2014: Rufous Hummingbird and Chick, Seattle, Washington, USA Canon  EOS-1D X, EF 200-400mm f/4L Read more…

Technique Tuesday: What to Shoot in September/October | Art Wolfe

By Art Wolfe with Jay Goodrich Maybe it’s time to think small, macro small. September and October in the Pacific Northwest present wet dew laden mornings which are perfect for photographing tiny intimate landscapes, insects in your garden, abstracting details of a flower into a wash of color, or a spider’s web suspending drops of Read more…

Technique Tuesday: Horizon Placement & Depth | Art Wolfe

AW: One of the most common errors I see in portfolio reviews is the placement of the horizon in the middle of the photograph. In my opinion, this flattens out the image, creating less of a sense of depth.  Placing the horizon high in the frame or low, on the other hand, can create a Read more…

Technique Tuesday: Conveying Scale | Art Wolfe

Looking for a sense of scale can be another way of defining a composition and influencing how you place your subject. Scale is simply a way to give the viewer perspective on how big the scene is within the photograph. Once you understand how to use scale, you can decide in each case whether or Read more…

Technique Tuesday: Diagonals | Art Wolfe

Often you’ll hear artists talking about diagonal lines within a composition. Diagonal lines can be very important to an image because of how they affect the mood and visual impression of a scene. However, diagonals are not just about line. You can have diagonal shapes and patterns as well. Diagonals are always dynamic elements within Read more…

Technique Tuesday: Quality of Light & Time of Day | Art Wolfe

Full midday sunlight is usually the worst for photography. Its direct overhead lighting produces flatness of form and washed-out colors. Most professional photographers choose mornings or afternoons, when light moves toward the warmer end of the spectrum. But it is not just for warmth of color; early and late in the day, the tonal range Read more…